If You’re Not Angry, You’re Not Paying Attention…

Well, the only person talking about love thy brother is the preacher
And it seems nobody’s interested in learning but the teacher
Segregation, determination, demonstration, integration
Aggravation, humiliation, obligation to my nation

– ‘Ball Of Confusion’ by The Temptations

Hello everyone, we’re still alive here in APITEland – hope all of you are staying safe too.

I haven’t posted in a while for a couple of reasons:

1) I wanted the interview with Evan to keep ‘top billing’ for a while.

2) Since posting the above a lot has been going on in the world that I didn’t want to detract from.

But I need to get something out, so will keep it short.

There’s a lot of justifiable anger out there right now. From Black Lives Matter, to the fiasco that is the United States’ handling of the Covid-19 crisis, to Millions of Unemployed, to the whole (quoting literal) Ball Of Confusion we’ve been living in for decades continually bubbling up to the surface from every direction as of late. 

Trying to make the best out of our collective nightmare I’ve been catching up on reading during my off-time from EduCorp®. I just finished Angrynomics by Eric Lonergan and Mark Blyth, and I highly recommend that you put this on your reading shortlist.

It’s timely, short, engaging, and enlightening, putting into perspective a lot about what is going on with the ‘Average Jane and Joe’ right now. Eric and Mark delineate the differences between Tribal Anger and Public Anger (Echo Chamber vs. Moral Outrage, if you will), and how to tell which is which out there in our firehose of media inundation – and if you are being manipulated by confusing the two by the unscrupulous. Although the book deals with the (as derived from the title) Economic side of things, it really shows that decades of economic inequality is the root of evil for these problems and countless more besides. 

Unlike many other books I’ve dug into lately it doesn’t just say ‘well, that’s why people are pissed off and good luck doing anything about it.’ Lonergan and Blyth present in their final dialog three real-world solutions to our blinding financial inequity that could level the playing field for everyone. They even play by the ‘current rules’ with them – as you would expect a Hedge Fund Manager and an Economist (Lonergan and Blyth respectively) to do. Even if it just gets people talking about these ideas as a launchpad, it’s a welcome change to see them added here. 

You can buy the book from the usual Interwebz® suspects in physical or digital if you must. Buy from Bookshop.org if you want to support your local business. If your local library has it, request it and get it sdelivered if possible. If they support Libby (or other online lenders) you can find it there. But do check it out. It might make you a bit more angry once you finish, but that anger will be tempered towards the ‘Public Good’ rather than ‘Business As Usual’. Because a society is only as free as the least free person in it, and only as wealthy as the poorest soul.

Stay safe, wear a face mask if you go out, and help out however you can out there. Until next time…